Home » Annals of Hawick, A.D.M. CC. XIV.-A.D.M. DCCC. XIV. by James Wilson
Annals of Hawick, A.D.M. CC. XIV.-A.D.M. DCCC. XIV. James Wilson

Annals of Hawick, A.D.M. CC. XIV.-A.D.M. DCCC. XIV.

James Wilson

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Philloiphauch sall direct them, and never to return againe, underMorePurchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Philloiphauch sall direct them, and never to return againe, under ye payne of deid, of yair awin consent, except they bring ane testimoniall fra the captaine. The said day, Johne Ellott that came out of Carleill, and Edward Irwing, sone to Lang Will of Hoddame, actit themselffis judiciallie, and of yair awin consent, to depairt presentlie fra yis kingdome of Scotland, and never to returne thairin, without licence of his Majesties Lords of his Secret Council, or Commissioneris, under ye pain of deid, without farder law. APPENDIX. APPENDIX. i. GAVIN DOUGLAS. The most illustrious individual connected with Ha- wick in ancient times was probably Gavin Douglas, afterwards Bishop of Dunkeld. He was the third son of Archibald, sixth Earl of Angus, better known as Bell-the-Cat, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Robert, Lord Boyd, sometime High Chamberlain of Scotland, and was born about 1474. Having entered into holy orders, he was appointed Rector of Hawick- in 1509, was nominated Provost of the collegiate church of St Giles, in Edinburgh- and finally, in 1515, on the death of George Brown, Bishop of Dunkeld, he was promoted to that episcopate. The political rivalries, and factious opposition, to this and previous preferments, which embittered his existence, and ultimately compelled him to leave his native county, and seek protection from Henry VIII. it is here unnecessary to detail, the rather that they have been succinctly and accurately set forth in the portion appropriated to Douglas by Dr Irving, in his valuable Lives of the Scottish Poets. In 1522, when probably in his forty -eighth year, he fell a victim to the plague in London, and was interred in the Savoy Church there, on the left of Thomas Halsay, Bishop of Leighlin. According to Hume, the historian of his...