Home » The Black Diamond:Complete series(annotated) by Francis Brett Young
The Black Diamond:Complete series(annotated) Francis Brett Young

The Black Diamond:Complete series(annotated)

Francis Brett Young

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Kindle Edition
333 pages
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 About the Book 

ABNER FELLOWS was born in the front bedroom of Number Eleven Hackett’s Cottages, a four-roomedhouse of old brickwork that stood in the middle of a row of twenty-one, set diagonally across a patchof waste land on the outskirts of Halesby. TheMoreABNER FELLOWS was born in the front bedroom of Number Eleven Hackett’s Cottages, a four-roomedhouse of old brickwork that stood in the middle of a row of twenty-one, set diagonally across a patchof waste land on the outskirts of Halesby. The terrace was fifty years old, and looked older, for thesmoke and coal dust of the neighbouring pits had corroded the surface of the bricks, while the‘crowning in’ of the earth’s crust above the gigantic burrowings of the Great Mawne Colliery hadloosened the mortar between them and even produced a series of long cracks that clove the house-walls from top to bottom like conventional forked lightning. One of these lines of cleavage split theface of Number Eleven and ran through the middle of a plaster plaque on which the pious owner ofthe cottages had carved the words:—ISAIAH HACKETT:GLORY BE TO GOD.This plaque, together with the metal medallion of a fire insurance corporation and two iron bossesconnected with the system of stays by which Mr Hackett’s descendants had tried to save theirproperty from collapsing, made the Fellows’s house the most decorative feature of the row, and gaveAbner a feeling of enviable distinction in his childhood long before he knew what they meant.His father, John Fellows, like the rest of the tenants, was a miner. He had chosen to live in Hackett’sCottages because they lay nearer to the colliery than any other buildings in Halesby and were within areasonable distance of the cross-roads where stood his favourite public-house, the Lyttleton Arms.Hackett’s Cottages, in fact, hung poised, as it were, between two magnetic poles: the pit where themoney was earned and the pub where it was spent. To remain there contented would have implied anice equilibrium, had it not been that eastward of the cross-roads and the Lyttleton Arms ran theStourton Road, with houses on both sides of it, and amongst them the Lord Nelson, the Greyhound,and the Royal Oak. Next to the Royal Oak came the entrance of the Mawne United football ground,and since John Fellows’s passion for football was only exceeded by his devotion to ‘four-penny,’ thepull of the colliery was hopelessly overbalanced by these delights.Just an an introduction.........Get your copy and enjoy the full story.